Review: Why Men Love Bitches by Sherry Argov


Title: Why Men Love Bitches
Author: Sherry Argov
Publication Date: October 1, 2002
Publisher: Adams Media
Genre: Self-Help, Psychology, Relationships

From Doormat to Dreamgirl—A Woman's Guide to Holding Her Own in a Relationship

Do you feel like you are too nice? Sherry Argov's Why Men Love Bitches delivers a unique perspective as to why men are attracted to a strong woman who stands up for herself. With saucy detail on every page, this no-nonsense guide reveals why a strong woman is much more desirable than a "yes woman" who routinely sacrifices herself. The author provides compelling answers to the tough questions women often ask:

· Why are men so romantic in the beginning and why do they change?
· Why do men take nice girls for granted?
· Why does a man respect a woman when she stands up for herself?

Full of advice, hilarious real-life relationship scenarios, "she says/he thinks" tables, and the author's unique "Attraction Principles," Why Men Love Bitches gives you bottom-line answers. It helps you know who you are, stand your ground, and relate to men on a whole new level. Once you've discovered the feisty attitude men find so magnetic, you'll not only increase the romantic chemistry—you'll gain your man's love and respect with far less effort.

Review: Irreversible Damage by Abigail Shrier


Title: Irreversible Damage
Author: Abigail Shrier
Publication Date: June 30, 2020
Publisher: Regnery Publishing
Genre: Politics, Non-fiction, Parenting
Irreversible Damage is an exploration of a mystery: Why, in the last decade, has the diagnosis "gender dysphoria," transformed from a vanishingly rare affliction, applying almost exclusively to boys and men, to an epidemic among teenage girls?

Author Abigail Shrier presents shocking statistics and stories from real families to show that America and the West have become fertile ground for a "transgender craze" that has nothing to do with real gender dysphoria and everything to do with our cultural frailty. Teenage girls are taking courses of testosterone and disfiguring their bodies. Parents are undermined; experts are over-relied upon; dissenters in science and medicine are intimidated; free speech truckles under renewed attack; socialized medicine bears hidden consequences; and an intersectional era has arisen in which the desire to escape a dominant identity encourages individuals to take cover in victim groups.

Every person who has ever had a skeptical thought about the sudden rush toward a non-binary future but been afraid to express it—this book is for you.

Quarantine Thoughts


It's been a long time. 

In the span of a year since The Whimsical Olive has been updated, so much has happened. Currently, I'm stuck in a three day quarantine as a requirement of Hong Kong's travel policies in order to study here for four months. I was about to lose my mind to boredom until I found this old gem--I forgot it had even existed. However, as the name of this blog suggests, this is the blog of The Whimsical Olive--posts are spontaneous, freespirited, and random. I never liked forcing myself to write on a regular basis unless I have legitimate inspiration, hence I gave up on becoming a professional writer long ago. 

It feels so strange to be writing again--this part of me that I have buried deep into the ground like the treasures on Monte Cristo--I am finally digging them up again and taking revenge on my enemies (just kidding). One thing I was always afraid of was introspection; writing became too painful, too raw, and made me feel too vulnerable. Perhaps there was a time period where I revelled in these emotions but I felt self absorbed doing so. But something I've learned over the year is that those emotions will always be there, they are never gone, only repressed. They come out in ways you don't expect, outbursts that are random, and discomfort that feels alien. The easy way out is to run away. The hard thing to do is to face your demons. 

Review: The Midnight Library by Matt Haig

Title: The Midnight Library
Author: Matt Haig
Publication Date: September 29, 2020
Publisher: Viking
Between life and death there is a library, and within that library, the shelves go on forever. Every book provides a chance to try another life you could have lived. To see how things would be if you had made other choices . . . Would you have done anything different, if you had the chance to undo your regrets?

A dazzling novel about all the choices that go into a life well lived, from the internationally bestselling author of Reasons to Stay Alive and How To Stop Time.

Somewhere out beyond the edge of the universe there is a library that contains an infinite number of books, each one the story of another reality. One tells the story of your life as it is, along with another book for the other life you could have lived if you had made a different choice at any point in your life. While we all wonder how our lives might have been, what if you had the chance to go to the library and see for yourself? Would any of these other lives truly be better?

In The Midnight Library, Matt Haig’s enchanting new novel, Nora Seed finds herself faced with this decision. Faced with the possibility of changing her life for a new one, following a different career, undoing old breakups, realizing her dreams of becoming a glaciologist; she must search within herself as she travels through the Midnight Library to decide what is truly fulfilling in life, and what makes it worth living in the first place.

Review: The Hating Game by Sally Thorne

Title: The Hating Game
Author: Sally Thorne
Release Date: August 9, 2016
Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks
Nemesis (n.) 1) An opponent or rival whom a person cannot best or overcome.
2) A person’s undoing
3) Joshua Templeman

Lucy Hutton has always been certain that the nice girl can get the corner office. She’s charming and accommodating and prides herself on being loved by everyone at Bexley & Gamin. Everyone except for coldly efficient, impeccably attired, physically intimidating Joshua Templeman. And the feeling is mutual.

Trapped in a shared office together 40 (OK, 50 or 60) hours a week, they’ve become entrenched in an addictive, ridiculous never-ending game of one-upmanship. There’s the Staring Game. The Mirror Game. The HR Game. Lucy can’t let Joshua beat her at anything—especially when a huge new promotion goes up for the taking.

If Lucy wins this game, she’ll be Joshua’s boss. If she loses, she’ll resign. So why is she suddenly having steamy dreams about Joshua, and dressing for work like she’s got a hot date? After a perfectly innocent elevator ride ends with an earth-shattering kiss, Lucy starts to wonder whether she’s got Joshua Templeman all wrong.

Maybe Lucy Hutton doesn’t hate Joshua Templeman. And maybe, he doesn’t hate her either. Or maybe this is just another game.